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Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Maggie on Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:06 am

Author Amanda Sun is here today, tomorrow and Sunday to ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS! Ask away!

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:05 am

Hi everyone! *waves* Thank you, Write On, for having me. I'm excited to answer your questions! I love you

Here's a little info about me. My debut novel, INK, is out July 2013 from Harlequin TEEN. It's a YA paranormal set in Japan. After her mother's death, Katie moves to Japan to live with her English-teaching aunt. She crosses paths with the arrogant and gorgeous kendo star at her school, Tomohiro, whose drawings come to life in dangerous ways, which has sparked unwanted attention from the Yakuza and Japan's paranormal underworld.

Full flap copy is up on Goodreads here! [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

I also have short fiction published, in anthologies and lit mags. And I volunteer for Room Magazine, a women's literary magazine, where I read about 400 queries a year. And when I'm not writing, I like gaming, knitting nerdy things, and cosplaying.

I'm looking forward to any questions you have about querying, writing, revisions, or INK. Ask away! ^_^[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Maggie on Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:20 am

I'll start things out with a couple questions! Smile

1. What are your thoughts on teen writers as far as pursuing publication goes?

2. What's your favorite part of the writing process -- plotting, drafting, revising, editing? And why?

3. What's your favorite genre to write and/or read?

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:51 am

Good questions, Maggie!

1. I have read some fantastic teen writers! Even Stephen King was out querying his work at 14. I think if publication is a dream of yours, then it's something you don't have to wait to pursue. Read, read, read in your genre and write the best work you can. Polish it, have others read it, and when you're sure it's your best work, go ahead and send it out. Age is irrelevant to an excellent writing voice, so don't feel you need to mention your age in the query.

Just remember as you query that it is a journey. Glean what info you can from the feedback agents or markets give you. If you get a form rejection, be proud--you had the courage to send your work out there. And if you get comments, even better! And don't forget to work on a new piece while you're querying the first.


2. I think my favorite part of the writing process is the first draft, but only after a couple chapters have been written. A blank page can be really intimidating, but it's also fresh--you can write anything, and anything could happen to your characters! I love how the book will often twist in a way I didn't see coming.

Revision is also an amazing part of the process. I never used to like revising much--I got very attached to my words, and I was worried if I started editing them, the seams would show like patchwork. But I have the best editor at Harlequin TEEN. He is passionate about my work, and I know I can trust his opinions. When his advice resonates with me, it's exciting to see how the revisions take the book to a new level I didn't even know was possible! That's the great thing about writing--nothing is set in stone. Even the old myths and stories have thousands of retellings, so don't be afraid to revise yours. You'll learn a lot too!


3. My favorite genre is YA. I love it! I read almost exclusively YA and I can't get my hands on enough books! I think YA is a really exciting genre to be in right now. The books are edgy, by which I mean they're not afraid to push their chars into difficult situations. Teens (and Teen protags) have a real energy and passion to tackle the problems facing them. Everything is fresh and intense, like they could take on the whole world! I'm so glad I get to write Teen books!
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  KayeM on Fri Jul 27, 2012 3:34 pm

Hi, Amanda! Wow - what a coincidence that I added INK to my GoodReads last night. Smile

Hmm...I'm always interested in authors' personal journeys. What made you write your book and consider publication for it?

Also, what are you reading right now?
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:35 pm

Hi Kaye,

Thanks for your questions! Too funny you just found INK. Thanks for adding it to your Goodreads! Very Happy

INK wasn't the first novel I wrote. Like many (most?) authors, it took me a few years to get an agent. I always knew I wanted to be a writer, and I had a few short stories published, but the first serious novel I wrote was actually a traditional fantasy, very Narnia-like and with a slightly more MG slant. When I was trying to find an agent for it, I realized that I was a bit out of touch with the marketplace. I spent a year reading everything in YA I could get my hands on.

At the same time, I'd lived in Osaka on exchange and studied Japanese in university. In my spare time I was watching a lot of JDramas, both for language practice and because I LOVE Asian Dramas--they're unpredictable, and you're not guaranteed a happy ending. Then I suddenly realized that maybe I should "write what I love" as they say. And so I decided to try for an urban fantasy/paranormal, set in Japan.

Actually, to be honest, I'd thought originally of writing a contemporary set in Japan. And then in one scene, Katie was looking over Tomohiro's shoulder at his sketch--and it moved! And then I realized the book would be a paranormal. ^_^


For reading, I seem to be on a contemporary kick at the moment. I just finished The Sky is Everywhere, which I really enjoyed. Very rich and beautiful writing voice. I also read The Opposite of Tidy, which was a unique book about a teen with a hoarder mom. I've never read anything like that so it was neat! Now I'm in the middle of Pretty Amy. I'm ready to head back into some dystopians and paranormals afterward, I think.

Would love to know what all of you are reading, too!

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Rachel on Sat Jul 28, 2012 9:54 am

Hi Amanda! Thanks so much for doing this with us—I love hearing from authors about their journey, etc. (INK sounds amazing—it's on my to-read list once it comes out!)

Could you talk (er, type?) a bit about how you go about the writing process? Pre-drafting, plotting/pantsing/a combination, how you tackle character development, things like that. Do you find that one method is more effective for you than the others? Do you prefer a particular way of revising?

My reading pile is very confused, haha. I'm reading some fantasy, contemporary, and historical to broaden my knowledge in those fields, but I'm also doing a lot of research (for my WIP) in archetypes and how they factor into various traditional tales, the kind of psychology at work behind this sort of character or that.

Again, thanks so much for doing this!

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sat Jul 28, 2012 2:18 pm

Hi Rachel, thanks for your question! And you're so welcome. It's my pleasure to hang out with you guys this weekend! Smile

When I start a new story, it's usually because a daydream has evolved and won't go away. Laughing There's usually one scene that keeps replaying, and I start wondering about the characters in it. For INK, it was Katie, newly arrived in Japan, looking over Tomohiro's shoulder at his drawing, and seeing it move. Then I sit down and make point form notes of things I imagine happening in the book. It's a very loose outline, and it's always fun to look at later because the finished product is always very different! I also make notes about each character, and as I write, I learn more about them from the way they interact with each other. They'll say things to each other that surprise me, and I'll know whether it's in character or not. Then I sit down and ask myself the difficult questions about their backgrounds. I also have a good friend who asks me tough questions about my characters and worlds. If I can't answer her well, I know I need to do some more thinking! If I have the wrong backstory for a char, it will feel wrong. I keep backtracking until the details sound right to me.

I've always been a pantser, but I've learned that a bit of forethought will help me from running myself into too many corners. I usually have the beginning and end more or less figured out, and a couple dots along the way to connect them. Now that I have a publisher, I have to submit an outline of my next book to be approved, so it's changed my process a bit! I have to have a stronger road map before I start. I write from beginning to end chronologically, and thanks to reading too much Pratchett growing up, I write without any chapters. I add them in later, fixing up the ends and beginnings for flow.

And, here's my writer's quirk--when I write, I like to have food related to the work to snack on. I had to buy a lot of cold milk tea and green tea candies to make it through my copy edits for INK. The tastes help evoke the landscape of Japan for me, so that I feel like I'm there while I write. It's a tasty quirk to have!


Sounds like you're reading some awesome books! Research can take a lot of time but it's sure worth it in the end. As readers we can easily spot well-developed worlds from half-built ones, right? Smile And it's the same for characters. We have to know a LOT more about them than is ever put into the actual book. But at the same time, I don't like to be too strict with details in a scene or, for example, what a character looks like. One of the best things about reading is imagining the scene how YOU want it to play out, and so I try to touch on details lightly so that the books belong to their readers. (as John Green always says)
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sat Jul 28, 2012 2:50 pm

Oh, and how I tackle revisions! So from my beta readers, comments are usually pretty casual in nature. With my editor, I get an actual edit letter, which can be several pages long. Some revisions are easy to interpret--things that don't make sense, characters that are too rough around the edges, etc. Those are concrete revisions that are easy to make.

But I've found that the usually BIG comments about the manuscript are abstract. Things like, "I just didn't connect with this character" or "I didn't feel like this plot element was clear" or "I felt like I needed more from this char/that scene" etc. I have to admit, I panic a little about these kind of notes--sometimes you KNOW there is a problem, but you're not sure how to fix it!

What I've found really helps is to make a point form list. Solve the abstract problem with concrete solutions! For example, I'll write down: "Problem: Didn't connect with char." And then I'll write a list of actual steps I can take to solve the problem. Why didn't the reader connect? Maybe not enough scenes showing her likeable side? So I'll put down, "add scenes where we see this side of character." Was she too close-minded to the reader? "Extend dialogue that's already there, make her be more honest with herself in narration." Then I'll take that list to my editor and bounce my ideas off to see what we think will solve the problem.

And that's another thing--when you have an editor, he's not there to tell you to change your story. He's there as your partner, helping you to get the best out of your story. You're a team, and it's a great feeling to have someone who loves your characters and world as much as you do.

I hope that's helpful! Revisions used to really scare me but I've seen now how much better my work gets when I'm willing to put in the work. I always wait a few days to absorb my edit letter, though. The revisions have to resonate with me so that I know what I'm doing will improve the book!
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Alyssa on Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:54 pm

Good questions and answers so far. Smile

I have some questions:

1. Do you have deadlines? If so, do they scare you/how do you handle them?

2. Before you got published or had an agent, what did you not realize you would have to deal with in your journey to publication that you've had to deal with?
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Amanda on Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:14 pm

See, I wasn't going to ask any questions, but now that I've seen the Twitter announcement—jk, I was holed up in my editing cave, and I'm only now coming up for air. Razz

I think I just have two (paragraphs of) questions, though I might think of more:

1) About how many drafts do you go through, on average, per book? Is there an average, or are some books just harder than others? About how many rounds of editing do you usually do before you decide something's ready for outside eyes?

2) Does having deadlines/a publisher possibly breathing down your neck affect your process other than the use of outlines? Does it change how you feel at any given point in the process, in a positive or negative way?

Thanks so much for being here, Amanda! Oh, and I like your name, just putting that out there. Wink
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Maggie on Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:18 pm

amanda_sun wrote:Good questions, Maggie!

1. I have read some fantastic teen writers! Even Stephen King was out querying his work at 14. I think if publication is a dream of yours, then it's something you don't have to wait to pursue. Read, read, read in your genre and write the best work you can. Polish it, have others read it, and when you're sure it's your best work, go ahead and send it out. Age is irrelevant to an excellent writing voice, so don't feel you need to mention your age in the query.

Just remember as you query that it is a journey. Glean what info you can from the feedback agents or markets give you. If you get a form rejection, be proud--you had the courage to send your work out there. And if you get comments, even better! And don't forget to work on a new piece while you're querying the first.


2. I think my favorite part of the writing process is the first draft, but only after a couple chapters have been written. A blank page can be really intimidating, but it's also fresh--you can write anything, and anything could happen to your characters! I love how the book will often twist in a way I didn't see coming.

Revision is also an amazing part of the process. I never used to like revising much--I got very attached to my words, and I was worried if I started editing them, the seams would show like patchwork. But I have the best editor at Harlequin TEEN. He is passionate about my work, and I know I can trust his opinions. When his advice resonates with me, it's exciting to see how the revisions take the book to a new level I didn't even know was possible! That's the great thing about writing--nothing is set in stone. Even the old myths and stories have thousands of retellings, so don't be afraid to revise yours. You'll learn a lot too!


3. My favorite genre is YA. I love it! I read almost exclusively YA and I can't get my hands on enough books! I think YA is a really exciting genre to be in right now. The books are edgy, by which I mean they're not afraid to push their chars into difficult situations. Teens (and Teen protags) have a real energy and passion to tackle the problems facing them. Everything is fresh and intense, like they could take on the whole world! I'm so glad I get to write Teen books!

Awesome answers!! I especially want to quote you on #2. I, too, love drafting best of all, and you worded it so beautifully. Smile

Thank you!!

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Maggie on Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:27 pm

More questions! Smile

1. How far into the future have you thought with your writing-- where do you want it to take you? Or do you take it day by day? Have you ever considered what you would do if you were to become a REALLY big deal?

2. You mentioned you're a pantser. Have you learned to work around / overcome your instinct to pants? Because I know from experience that it doesn't really work in your favor if you want a strong, well-plotted story. XD Any tips on that would be helpful, too!

3. Have you ever had the too-many-stories-to-write issue, where you have trouble concentrating on just one project and finishing it? If so, how did you / do you combat it? (And if not, no worries! I know I may be out of the norm with this problem. Laughing )

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Constance on Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:36 am

My questions are...um...slightly more focused on a different area. Because I find it overwhelmingly interesting. You sort of touched on it in one of your other responses, but I was hoping you would go into a bit more detail...? Here goes.

INK is set in Japan. Did you find writing a story set in a foreign country with a different language(as opposed to, say, ANNA AND THE FRENCH KISS, where the MC went to a boarding school where they spoke English) difficult? How did you get around that? Did the characters all know English––which wouldn't be that implausible, from what I know about Japan and Korea and English-learning––or does Katie just stumble through conversations?

Second, what was writing about Japan's culture like? I've done different cultures, but those were in fantasy stories where I could make up the details...Have you been to Japan enough that you felt comfortable just writing or did you research every little detail?

Also, I just have to say, I ADORE Asian dramas. Korean especially, Japan right after that, and then ANIME. *hyperventilates* Ahem. I am excited for INK. ^_^
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sun Jul 29, 2012 1:19 pm

Hi Alyssa, thanks for your questions!

1. Yes, I do have deadlines! Since I'm still a fairly newly acquired author (I signed a contract with HarlequinTEEN last fall so almost a year ago), I haven't had too many deadlines piled on top of each other yet, although I did only have four or five days to turn around my line edit, and just a week for the copy edit. My editor is always trying to be reasonable with my deadlines, but while the publishing world is a slooow process, when they need something from you, they need it right away! Laughing

The only deadline that scared me was for a secret project (which I'll be announcing once my website is up and running in the fall!), because I was given a tight deadline to go from empty page to something substantial in a short amount of time. My nerves got the better of me and I wondered if maybe they'd got the wrong writer, because even now the doubt doesn't go away (I have a vicious inner editor haha!). But I pulled through and they were pleased with the result, so yay!

When I have deadlines, especially tight ones, I break them down so I can manage. So, INK is about 350 pages, and I have a week to turn around copy edits. I like to give myself an emergency buffer, so I divide 350 by 6 or even 5 days instead of the whole week I have. So I have to edit 70 pages a day. If it seems like a lot, I break that down as well--say 35 pages in the morning, and 35 in the evening. That's very doable! And if I can't hit the target for one day or another, I have that safety buffer day (although so far I haven't needed to use it yet).

When I have deadlines that overlap, which has happened a couple times, I just prioritize whichever is due first. My editor, too, helps by letting me know which material is most urgent and which can wait.


2. Before I got published or agented, I wasn't prepared for how unpredictable publishing is. Case in point, the editor who acquired my book left the publishing house two months later! Because INK is set in Japan, when my agent sent it out on submission there were a lot of editors who liked it but didn't feel comfortable enough with the foreign setting to edit the book. And so when I found a home with Harlequin TEEN, it was a huge relief. And then my editor left, and I was worried--what if my new editor didn't like the book, or didn't feel comfortable with the topic? But I was SO lucky, because my editor TS Ferguson not only gets it, he REALLY gets it. He loves Kpop and Asian Dramas too, and is familiar with the Asian landscape. I can write to him and say "Do you think this line sounds too DeathNote-ish?" and he'll understand what I'm talking about. YAY! It was meant to be.

My book was also moved from Feb to July 2013, and also the sheer amount of revision surprised me too. So it's unpredictable, but at the same time, I didn't expect the amount of support and love I get from the publishing team. It's amazing to have a whole TEAM of people rally behind my book and believe in it. It's such a great feeling.
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sun Jul 29, 2012 1:40 pm

Hi Amanda! Love your name too! Laughing

1) INK went through two major revisions before I got my agent. The first was my own personal edit. I had two friends read it to give me general comments and then I tidied things up. Then I had two agents request specific edits, which were fairly substantial. I agreed with the changes and made them. Both agents had said we might talk about representation after the edits. And when I proudly submitted the new result, BOTH rejected. What a lesson in humility! But the edits definitely made the book better--it just wasn't quite there yet.

Once I signed with Melissa Jeglinski at The Knight Agency, she had me do a more minor round of revisions before putting the book on submission. And with Harlequin TEEN, I went through one major revision and one minor before moving onto line edits.

So INK went through five major revisions to get where it is now. Wow! Luckily there were breaks in between, so I could regroup and gather the courage and energy to tackle it again.

When I write something, I usually do one major edit before it's ready to be read by others. I go through and read as a reader, see what bothers me and what looks okay. If possible, I get my agent and my close friend to read through before I send it to my editor, just to make sure it's readable haha. I'm a really picky reader, so I usually just want their general comments versus details. That's what I look forward to my from my editor. Smile


2) If anything, the deadlines help me! Part of my writing process has always been walking around in sheer terror of the project for a couple days (this includes editing rounds). Even after I've absorbed the edit letter and talked to my editor about how I'm going to tackle the revision, I take a few days where I stare at the computer with fear. After those days, I open the file and stare at it for a day. And after that, the awareness of the deadline kicks in and I get to work. I've learned this is just how I cope with edits or a new project. And it's okay, because my brain is working on it. At least that's my excuse. Smile

However, if I have a week to turn around edits, I don't have the luxury to freak out for days. Very Happy Instead I freak out for a couple hours, and get moving because I have to. So I'm kind of glad to have deadlines, because I can be such an awful procrastinator. The thing about writing and editing novels is that they're so long! It's not something you can finish in one day, and so it takes a lot to stick to it and carry on. Most days, I have so much editing left that I feel I'm in the middle of a forest, with no way out, no light from outside even permeating to where I am. The middles are the hardest. But each step takes you closer, and so I just keep taking that step so I don't stay lost.

Thanks for your questions!
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sun Jul 29, 2012 2:13 pm

Thanks Maggie! And great questions. I hope my answers aren't tl;dr. I'm trying not to be too wordy ^_^

1. Haha, every writer dreams of being a big deal, don't they? I have no problem if I have to move into a castle with a secret library accessed by a lever on the wall. ;D What I've always, always wanted though is to connect with readers. I want to share the worlds I write about with them, to write that book that stays with them, that becomes part of their collective inspiration for their own creative works. That's always been my dream. I'm really, really excited for the day I walk into a bookstore and see my book on the shelf, to know that I have that opportunity to have my work read by others.

So while a castle would be nice, I just want to be able to continue writing and connecting with readers.


2. It's true, I'm a natural pantser! But I don't think this has to stand in the way of a strong story. If you've read ON WRITING by Stephen King, you'll see that he, too, is more or less a pantser. The first draft gives you a general shape of things, and after that you can chisel away and shape what you have. I think pantsers' advantage is that the writing flows on our own energy. We're excited to see where it's going, and that energy feeds into the voice and pace of the book. Do we write ourselves into corners that plotters don't? Sure. But we learn from it. I've found that having to outline now gives me a road map, but a vague enough way of how to get there that I can throw in odds and ends as they arise.

With pantsing, and this may be just me, I've found I can only go so far in a day and hit the "And then what?" And I have to step away from the writing at that point and let my mind figure out what's happening next. I've learned to trust this pool of inspiration. It only fills up so much, and then when it's empty, I have to leave it alone to fill again. So I guess my advice for pantsers is don't rush. If you don't know what happens, step back and think of a few different options. When you have one that feels right, keep going. Always choose scenes that push the characters in their journey. If vital info isn't being shared or vital changes aren't being made, then you'll likely have to cut the scene later.

I haven't learned to work around being a pantser, though. I look at my outlines as rather optional Wink Luckily so far my editor has trusted me and given the go ahead when I give vague outlines like "this will happen, and likely this will be looked at, and it will all turn out like this." I love that he respects my pantser origins! Smile


3. You're not alone on the too-many-stories-to-write issue! Novels are a lot of energy and work, and they can take months to complete. And just when it's getting the hardest, that new idea flits in front of your eyes, and you can't stop thinking about it! (for me, it's a YA dystopian that keeps poking me in the ribs). And that's good, because that's why you're a writer. You have any number of stories you can't wait to tell. The only important thing is to finish what you write. One of the things that held me back as a writer for years was that I didn't finish my work. This is okay, too, because it's part of the learning process. At first you write things you don't finish, but at some point, you need to move on from that point and finish your work. You learn things from ending stories.

INK is the second novel I actually finished (a few unfinished novels before). The first didn't sell, but I learned a lot from it. Mainly, how to write an ending. So log the new ideas away, make some notes on it if you like, or even start writing some if you're good at multi-tasking. Just don't give up on your current WIP until you've learned everything you can from it. For me, I'm really linear--I prefer to work on one project at a time if I can help it. At the very least, I try not to mix writing projects. If I'm working on two at a time, one needs to be in revision stage.
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sun Jul 29, 2012 2:55 pm

Hi Constance! Fantastic questions! And yay for Asian dramas! Very Happy I haven't watched as many Korean as Japanese, just because the JDramas double as good language practice/learning for me, but I'm hoping to watch some more KDramas soon. I used to watch a lot of anime too, but the shows I know are more old school (Sailor Moon, Fushigi Yuugi, Trigun).

Writing YA set in a foreign country is definitely a challenge. You want to make the experience authentic to the reader, and it's hard when you're not born into that country to get all the details right. At the same time, I didn't want the story to just be a guided tour through Japan. I wanted to read more YA where diversity and multiculturalism is the backdrop--not the main story. And so I decided to write what I wanted to read. Smile

I lived on exchange in Osaka, and have hosted and visited students from Shizuoka, the city INK is set in. I chose Shizuoka for a couple reasons--one, because I want readers to see a different slice of life than just Tokyo (this was also an act of rebellion in that most JDramas are set in Tokyo! haha), and two, because Shizuoka has some very interesting sites that inspired me when I visited there. I was lucky enough that I visited Shizuoka again just after finishing the first draft of INK. I took ridiculous amounts of photos and walked everywhere my characters had walked. The research helped a lot for the details in my book.

The protag of INK, Katie Greene, is a girl from New York State, and the only foreign country experience she has is staying with her grandparents in Canada for the summers. I wanted her to act as a window to make Japan accessible for the reader. And she has cultural opinions and actions that the Japanese characters don't always understand or agree with. But at the same time, I hope the main thing I'm showing with INK is that while life in Japan is different, it's also the same. Teens still have clubs, teams, homework. They still hang out and go for coffee and have issues in their life to deal with.

In terms of language, Katie struggles to communicate at times, and often characters try to speak English to her or have misunderstandings with her. The main problem for Katie is kanji-reading, things like signs and newspapers and so on. I tried to make her level of understanding realistic but not in a way that would hold the story back. A tricky balance, for sure! She attends a nightly cram school in the book as well to immerse her in learning the language.

For your second question, because I'd lived in Japan for a time and go back as frequently as possible, writing about Japan is reasonably comfortable for me. I watch a lot of Japanese school dramas to help fill in the blanks, and I have a good friend from Shizuoka who checks over any Japanese terms or dialogue I use, and answers any questions I have about school life. For my character names, I check with another friend in Osaka who gives me the okay that they are normal, natural names. Of course I live in fear that my book will have mistakes, but I've done everything I can to minimize them. At the very least, I hope INK will allow readers access to Japanese culture in the most authentic way I'm able to provide. Smile From there I hope readers will have the chance someday to experience Japan first-hand.

And on top of that, I like the unpredictability of Asian Dramas. You're not guaranteed a happy ending, first-place finish like you often are in North American dramas. And I've tried to emulate that style with INK so that you never know what will happen! Suspect

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Rachel on Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:34 pm

Thanks so much, Amanda! I've been away-from-the-internet for a lot of the past few days, so I'm a little late in responding, but this is *so* helpful. Thank you so much for spending this time with us! *cheers for Amanda's awesomeness*

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  amanda_sun on Sun Jul 29, 2012 10:06 pm

Aw, thanks Rachel! It was so fun to answer all the great questions you guys had! Thank you so much for having me. ^_^
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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Maggie on Mon Jul 30, 2012 1:07 pm

Belated, but THANK YOU so much for the amazing answers! I feel all inspired and encouraged. Smile

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Re: Q/A with author AMANDA SUN (right in here!)

Post  Constance on Thu Aug 02, 2012 11:40 pm

...Also belated. Much more so. *cough* But THANK YOU. Those were amazing answers.
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